How to Make the Hybrid Workspace Work?
📝

How to Make the Hybrid Workspace Work?

Questions

  • How to decide what's right for your team? Feedback from the team, management, and going forward.
  • The physical office and on-demand space. Acquiring and managing your office spaces.
  • Culture, people management, and inclusivity.

Key Takeaways

  • How to decide what's right for your team? Feedback from the team, management, and going forward.
    • Everyone is going through this together, the next moves are only trials to be iterated on. It'll be a phased approach and we must expect plans to change.
    • Surveys may not be accurate as everyone's comfort-levels and perceptions are changing daily - there's a disconnect between what people say they want vs what they'll do. Everyone's risk-appetite for safety is very different at the moment.
    • As with most things, there comes a point to make a decision and create rules going forward. Trying to please everyone may result in a solution that's not great for anyone.
    • Voluntary attrition may have been quite low over the past 12 months due to a slowed labour-market. Companies will evolve and demonstrate their values over the next few months and it's expected for the labour market to pick up and people to move around - it's important to remember that people leaving isn't necessarily a bad thing.
    • Go underneath the survey answers and attempt to understand the reasons behind them. For example, people may be hesitant to go into the office due to childcare or pets and supporting those specific reasons may result in a different answer.
  • The physical office and on-demand space. Acquiring and managing your office spaces.
    • Most companies planning to have employees in office 2-3 days a week and around 84% of companies will be working in a hybrid model.
    • There's a large pool of talent available if offering fully-remote positions, especially in tech.
    • Some opting for a lower-capacity reduced office with additional hot desk subscriptions.
    • Use gcal or software like Officeley or commonsurface.com for desk-booking.
    • Running hybrid meetings requires good tech - equip your meetings with static cameras and microphones (not just laptops) and ensure everyone knows how to use them.
    • Stagger your core hours to avoid public transport and rush-hour.
  • Culture, people management, and inclusivity.
    • Random and unintentional interactions in an office are often the biggest cross-functional learning opportunities. It's important as a business to determine your own appetite for such cross-functional culture.
    • Giving and receiving feedback is essential to growth and culture, and it's a lot harder virtually as there aren't those micro-interactions and small pointers. Virtually, it's often only the bigger things that seem to warrant a call.
    • Important to still run hybrid meetings with everyone dialling in virtually to ensure there's not a context or information debt, and enable everyone to feel included. Ensure the meeting owner is responsible for (and trained in) involving everyone in the meeting.
    • Don't stop asking how people are feeling, continue having the conversations. You can help facilitate this through pulse-surveys, Lattice, and even ask-me-anything anonymous google-forms.
    • If you're prioritising the cultural benefits that come with being in-office, think about how to incentivise presence - eating together, team food, a chef coming in weekly.

Participants & Breakout Rooms
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3 - Marta, Lydia, Riva, Charlie & Alex
Main session notes (Mike)
Main session notes (Ausrine)